NATIONAL REGISTER

The National Register of Historic Places is a prestigious designation, identifying the buildings, structures, objects, and sites most worthy of long-term preservation. Historic places at least fifty years old are eligible for listing if they are significant at the local, state, or national level for association with an important historical figure or event, as an important example of a particular architectural style, or for archaeological potential. Inclusion on the National Register is required to be eligible for rehabilitation tax credits and other financial incentive programs.

FEATURED PROJECTS

Enfield Historic District

Enfield, Halifax County, North Carolina

Zebulon Historic District

Zebulon, Wake County, North Carolina

Kinston Historic District

Kinston, Lenoir County, North Carolina

Oxford Historic District

Oxford, Granville County, North Carolina

The City of Oxford was the center of the tobacco industry in Granville and the surrounding counties from the Civil War through the late twentieth century. The success of the city's tobacco market fueled growth and resulted in the construction of large scale, high style homes near the downtown commercial district. The historic district also includes the Granville County Courthouse and other government buildings, surviving tobacco industry buildings, and neighborhoods of working class housing. (project with hmwPreservation)

Winton Historic District

Winton, Hertford County, North Carolina

The Town of Winton was established in the mid-1700s at the site of a ferry crossing on the Chowan River. After being burned almost entirely during the Civil War, the town slowly rebuilt during the late 1900s. The town serves as the county seat for Hertford County, but remains a relatively small town due to its lack of railroads and highways. The historic district retains a variety of late nineteenth and early twentieth century commercial and residential buildings, mid-twentieth century government buildings, and the C.S. Brown School complex, a significant African American boarding school founded in the late 1800s.  (project with hmwPreservation)

R.A. Clement School

Cleveland, Rowan County, North Carolina

The R.A. Clement School was built in 1931 to serve elementary school students. At the time of its construction, it was the largest school for African American students in Rowan County, with four classrooms, an auditorium, a library, and a principal's office. The elementary school taught first through eighth grades, but also taught some high school subjects. In 1942, a new auditorium building was constructed, followed by a new high school in 1948. The school closed in 1968 when the Rowan County schools were fully desegregated, and the students were reassigned to other schools. (project with hmwPreservation)

click here to view the nomination

College Heights Historic District

Durham, Durham County, North Carolina

College Heights (also known as College View) is a historically African American neighborhood that grew and developed alongside the adjacent North Carolina Central University. The modest houses line broad street with beautiful mature trees, and feature a variety of early to mid-twentieth century architectural styles. The earliest residents of the neighborhood included tobacco workers and laborers, followed by teachers, nurses, police officers, and business owners. (project with hmwPreservation)

 

click here to view the nomination

Sanford Tobacco Company Warehouse & Redrying Facility

Sanford, Lee County, North Carolina

The Sanford Tobacco Company built the first part of this Wicker Street facility in 1947, with an addition that doubled its size in 1951. This building was used to house the only redrying operation serving the Sanford tobacco market. The company constructed an adjacent warehouse to store the redried products, and also rented additional warehouses on McIntosh and Courtland Streets seasonally. The company downsized to cigar production before closing its doors in the 1990s. (project with hmwPreservation)

West Chapel Hill Historic District Expansion

Chapel Hill, Orange County, North Carolina

 

The West Chapel Hill Historic District was originally added to the National Register in 1998. It included the residential neighborhoods west of the University of North Carolina, which had grown steadily with the university since the 1840s. This original district included buildings constructed between 1845 and 1948. The expansion project extends the boundaries south of the existing district to also include buildings constructed between 1945 and 1970, including a number of architecturally significant mid-century Modern style houses. (project with hmwPreservation)

Concord School

Franklin County, North Carolina

 

The Concord School was built in 1921 to serve grades 1-7 in rural Franklin County. It was funded in part by the Julius Rosenwald Fund, which provided grants to build schools for African American students across the South in the 1920s. Concord School is a three-teacher school that was built based on the Rosenwald Fund's two-teacher plan, which included two classrooms, two cloak closets, an industrial room, and a privy and well outdoors. The plans were modified to add a third classroom and cloakroom. The school closed in 1955 when it was consolidated with schools in nearby Franklinton, and is now a community center. (project with hmwPreservation)

click here to view the nomination

Mars Hill School

Mars Hill, Madison County, North Carolina

 

The Mars Hill School was built in 1928 to serve grades 1-8 in rural Madison County. It was funded in part by the Julius Rosenwald Fund, which provided grants to build schools for African American students across the South in the 1920s. Mars Hill School was built based on the Rosenwald Fund's two-teacher plan, which included two classrooms, two cloak closets, an industrial room, and a privy and well outdoors. The school closed in 1965 when Madison County schools were desegregated, and is still owned by the Madison County Board of Education. (project with hmwPreservation)

click here to view the nomination

Lincoln Heights School

Wilkesboro, Wilkes County, North Carolina

 

The Lincoln Heights School was built in 1924 to serve grades 1-11. It was funded in part by the Julius Rosenwald Fund, which provided grants to build schools for African American students across the South in the 1920s. Lincoln Heights was built based on the Rosenwald Fund's six-teacher plan, which included six classrooms, six cloak closets, an industrial room, an auditorium, and a privy and well outdoors. The school was the only African American high school in northwestern North Carolina. Additional classrooms were added in 1926 and 1950 to make a ten-room school, and a shop, cafeteria, and high school building were added to the campus. The school closed in 1968 and now serves as a community center. (project with hmwPreservation)

click here to view the nomination

Castalia School

Nash County, North Carolina

 

The Castalia School was built in 1921 to serve grades 1-6 in rural Nash County. It was funded in part by the Julius Rosenwald Fund, which provided grants to build schools for African American students across the South in the 1920s. Castalia School was built based on the Rosenwald Fund's three-teacher plan, which included three classrooms, three cloak closets, an industrial room, and a privy and well outdoors. The school added three more classrooms in the 1940s and 1950s, and expanded to include grades 7 and 8. The school closed in 1961 and now serves as a community center. (project with hmwPreservation)

click here to view the nomination

Allen Grove School

Halifax, Halifax County, North Carolina

 

The Allen Grove School was built in 1922 to serve grades 1-6 in rural Halifax County. It was funded in part by the Julius Rosenwald Fund, which provided grants to build schools for African American students across the South in the 1920s. Allen Grove School was built based on the Rosenwald Fund's two-teacher plan, which included two classrooms, two cloak closets, an industrial room, and a privy and well outdoors. The school closed in 1959 when it was consolidated with larger schools nearby, and now serves as a 4-H camp. (project with hmwPreservation)

click here to view the nomination

Bladen County Training School

Elizabethtown, Bladen County, North Carolina

 

The Bladen County Training School was built in 1928 to serve grades 1-12 in Elizabethtown. It was funded in part by the Julius Rosenwald Fund, which provided grants to build schools for African American children across the South in the 1920s. Bladen County Training School was expanded from the Rosenwald Fund's six-teacher plan to include ten classrooms, two cloak closets, two industrial rooms, and a privy and well outdoors. The school closed in 1970 when it became an integrated elementary school. It now serves as a community center and military academy. (project with hmwPreservation)

click here to view the nomination

Canetuck School

Pender County, North Carolina

 

The Canetuck School was built in 1921 to serve grades 1-6 in rural Pender County. It was funded in part by the Julius Rosenwald Fund, which provided grants to build schools across the South in the 1920s. Canetuck School was built based on the Rosenwald Fund's two-teacher plan, which included to classrooms, two cloak closets, an industrial room, and a privy and well outdoors. The school closed in 1958 when it was consolidated with larger schools nearby, and now serves as a community center (project with hmwPreservation)

click here to view the nomination

West Martin School

Oak City, Martin County, North Carolina

 

The West Martin School is located on the east side of Oak City, in northwestern Martin County. Its complex includes four buildings: a 1951 high school building with 1956 addition, 1952 gymtorium, 1957 elementary building, and 1971 cafeteria.West Martin School served the western, rural, part of Martin County including the communities of Oak City, Hamilton, and Hassell, and it is the only extant African American high school in that region of Martin County. (project with hmwPreservation)

click here to view the nomination

Arthur C. and Mary S. Nash House

Chapel Hill, Orange County, North Carolina

 

The c.1926 Arthur C. and Mary S. Nash House was designed by and built for architect Arthur Cleveland Nash and his wife Mary. Nash served as the University Architect at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill from 1922 until 1930. He designed much of the South Quad of the UNC campus, the Carolina Inn, and a number of houses in Chapel Hill. His wife Mary was a renowned artists and portrait painter. The Nash House is located adjacent to campus and retains  most of the original materials and floor plan.

click here to view the nomination

Little River High School

​Bahama, Durham County, North Carolina

 

The Little River School was built in 1939 to serve the rural African American population of Durham County. It was the first rural high school for black children in Durham, and also included the elementary grades. Students were taught a curriculum that included agriculture and home economics, and veterans returning from World War II could also take these courses at night school. The school was integrated in 1970 when it became Little River Elementary School, and it closed in 1993. The school campus now houses a day care, a senior center, and an archives. (project with hmwPreservation)

click here to view the nomination

© Firefly Preservation Consulting, 2018

  • twitter.png
  • linked in.png
  • instagram.png
  • facebook.png